Keeping Your Mind and Body Connection Strong at Work

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Even before the ongoing health crisis broke out, the world was already filled with uncertainties and plenty of stressors. However, with half of the world going through some serious challenges such as unemployment, sickness, hunger, and loneliness due to isolation, the risk of developing serious mental and physical issues grows tenfold in light of current circumstances. Given this reality, it is then extremely important that professionals take the time to focus on their holistic well-being.

The mind and body connection

As a society focused on addressing physiological problems, it’s easy to see why a lot of people don’t realize that the mind affects the body just as much as the body affects the mind. Due to the growing consciousness surrounding mental health issues, Rosanna C. Rogacion explained that experts nowadays consider symptoms such as unexplained fatigue, weight loss, constipation, migraine, back pain and frequent colds as more than just symptoms attributed to outside stimuli, but also as probable physical manifestations of unresolved emotional upheaval. In fact, the modern world now recognizes a new line of diseases — called psychogenic or emotion-caused illnesses — which could possibly account for a large percentage of visits to doctors’ offices. This has successfully encouraged businesses to consider mental health just as much as physical health and has likewise compelled them to invest in office designs and equipment that improve both.

Unfortunately, now that much of the world is working remotely, the task of taking care of their well-being falls largely on the workers themselves. If you are one of those professionals who are working at home, here are some of the tips you can employ to keep your mind and body connection strong and healthy:

Tips for keeping your mind and body connection strong

A lot of people often forget that work efficiency and productivity heavily rely on how comfortable working conditions are. After all, discomfort, regardless of degree, can easily make one feel irritable, stressed and frustrated. Aside from making sure that your hands, wrists and fingers are always healthily positioned while working, an article by Pain Free Working suggests doing different stretching exercises that can prevent repetitive stress injuries. Try rotating your shoulders and wrists and stretching your fingers, arms and wrists every once in a while throughout your working hours.

Write about what you feel

Everything starts with the mind, and this very principle is also true when it comes to strengthening the mind and body connection. To be able to address issues that may affect both aspects of your well-being early on, consider keeping a journal where you can jot down everything that you are feeling. Thrive Global explains that doing so will help you become more aware of your thoughts and relieve some of the stress coming from cush thoughts. It would also be a good idea to change the way you talk to yourself and to dedicate some time to fully feel your emotions.

Watch what you eat

Working at home can make it tempting to eat whenever you feel like it. However, some of the things you snack on can have a direct impact not just on your work performance and productivity but also on your mood and emotions. To avoid feeling stressed and lethargic while working, stay away from foods that are high in sugar. Instead, opt for snacks that improve memory and concentration such as nuts, berries, avocados and salads made from green leafy vegetables. As explained in our previous post ‘Staying Healthy When You Work A Desk Job’, preparing your meals and snacks early on can be a great way to ensure that the food you eat boost your mood and physical health.

As a company that prides itself on having a unique vantage point and a creative and authentic way of looking at human capital, we strongly encourage professionals to take care of themselves, both mentally and physically, especially during these trying times. Keep your mind and body strong by taking the time to stretch, writing about what you feel and watching what you eat.

Written by Alisha Christina
Exclusive for thetreehousepartners.com

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